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Offline JWC

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Stories behind the photos
« on: November 21, 2009, 01:34:45 pm »
Got a story behind a photo...let's hear it.



The story behind this photo, of which I took many that day, began with a phone call from the CCC.  I worked for my uncle at the time at his repair shop in Fremont California.  One of our contracts was with the CCC and refurbishing their forestry trucks, all of which were four wheel drive Chevy Luv's.  Those little trucks impressed me with their ability to take a beating with very little drive train damage.  Probably the most common problem was leaking rear axle seals.

We had sent two transporters back, about eight trucks each, to Susanville California just before the July 4th weekend.  The day the trucks arrived, we received a phone call from CCC in Susanville rejecting the trucks for unspecified reasons.  We had a meeting and decided that since at least two of us had to go to Susanville, and the holiday was coming up, we'd all go and make a camping trip out of it.  The plan was to take two trucks; one with tools, the other with camping gear and towing a trailer mounted with an air compressor.  I was elected to ride in the lead truck with the tool boxes and act as navigator.

We took off from Fremont, glad to get away from the 100+ degree heat.  After we left I580 and started north, I mentioned that according to my calculations we were four or five hours from Susanville.  Jim, my uncle, asked if there was any other way that was quicker.  I mentioned that there was a road on the map that went from Taylorsville, across the mountain, and would let us out right at the edge of the town.   The only problem I saw was that it was a dirt road, but if it was well maintained, we would be in Susanville by the early afternoon.  So, we took that road.

Everything was going fine, the road was dirt, but was solid and there were hardly any ruts at all.  As we rounded a curve, we were greeted with snow.  It wasn't a big patch of snow, probably no more than a football field in length, but it was unexpected.  We pulled up to the edge of the patch.  Jim and I got out and walked about twenty feet across the snow and found it was only a few inches deep. No problem.

Jim jumped back into the truck and I grabbed my camera to record the "snow in July".  What we didn't know was the road took a dip about six feet further than we walked.  The OM1n had a motor drive on it and as snow began to fly as the van drove across it, I started shooting. Just as the van got right in front of me, the truck suddenly sunk into the small dip in the roadway and buried itself in the snow.


We didn't make Susanville that afternoon.  Instead, we spent the afternoon and evening trying to free the van.  We sent Rhett, the other driver, and the other truck to get groceries, since we had planned on getting camp food and drinks when we arrived in Susanville. We worked until just past midnight when the food arrived...six hours after we sent Rhett to find it.  It turned out that everything shut down early in town. He kept driving till he found a convenient store open which turned out to be about 150 miles away round trip.  We ended up eating Dinty Moore stew, chips, crackers, sodas, and he picked up a bottle of Southern Comfort.

We slept on the road that night; the night was beautiful and cold.  We woke up early and started digging again.  About two hours later, we finally got the van free.  The only other problem was we had used up almost all the gas trying to get it out.   

We took off again and sure enough, about halfway down the mountain the van ran out of gas.  Since we were heading downhill, it kept rolling for what seemed like another two or three miles until we got to the valley and a flat piece of road, where it slowly coasted to a stop.  We were waiting for the other truck....and we waited.  After thirty or forty minutes, Jim decided something was wrong and he started walking back up the mountain.  I stayed behind with the van and Jim's two kids.

Finally, the other truck appeared on the road...minus the trailer.   It seems that Mr. Colvin, who was riding with Rhett, noticed a tire passing them at one point.  Rhett looked in the mirror and saw they were dragging the trailer.  They couldn't stop because they had to keep up with the runaway tire, which had taken the middle of the road and was negotiating the curves like someone was steering it.  Unfortunately, instead of running out of steam and stopping in the road, it missed a curve, ran over the raised edge of the road and dropped down a steep embankment.  When Jim found them, they had just retrieved the tire and wheel.  The three of them lifted the trailer, complete with compressor, and set it into the back of Rhett's truck.

When we finally arrived at the CCC in Susanville, we found out that the trucks were rejected for one blown tail lamp bulb and a tail gate that wouldn't shut because a pebble was lodged between the gate and the bed.  We fixed the trucks in ten minutes.

The rest of the trip was uneventful, thankfully.  To this day, I'm reminded by Jim that I'm the one that picked the road, so it was my fault....and it gives us something look back at and laugh. 

BTW, Jim also sent the CCC a bill for being stupid....and they paid it.



The end of the snow:



I believe everything that man just said---because it was exactly what I wanted to hear.  Space Ghost


When you photograph people in colour you photograph their clothes.  But when you photograph people in B&W, you photograph their souls!  ~Ted Grant

Art should be vulnerable....images should be about what something feels like as well as what it looks like. Duane Michals

Offline JWC

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2009, 02:25:14 pm »
As promised, the story behind the Wasp-Pants photo:



I'm a senior project mentor for high school students who choose photography.  I'd been to this house before and ventured into the hallway, but that was during the summer.  I stopped in the hallway because of the buzzing.  It took me a few seconds to realize what the causing the buzzing noise....bees, wasps, and hornets.  The home had been abandoned in the 1980's and had since occupied by things that sting.  It was really eerie listening to the uproar of thousands of insects.  The sound emanated from behind every wall in the house.  I decided that I'd back out and return during the winter.

Well, that was the plan.  My current student is Kate.   During our initial interview, she mentioned she like taking pictures of old barns and houses.  Since part of the project includes a "field trip", I mentioned the old home.  We made a date to go out to it and photograph it...if there was no buzzing.

The house was built in the 1870's by a returning Civil War captain.  The road leading up to it was probably the original "drive-way".  It was very common for the well-to-do to build their homes away from a main road and make a country lane leading up to the main house.   This "lane" is about a 1/4 mile and when you are driving down it to the house, you can imagine the buggies and carriages arriving on a Saturday afternoon for a picnic or wedding....very "Gone with the Wind".

When Kate and I arrived at the house, I went in first to make sure that were no squatters, including bees.  The house was empty of all living creatures.  Kate took the 10D and being the fearless teen she is, started working.  I decided she was having too much fun and she wasn't asking many questions, so I decided to take a few frames myself and got the 30D from Kate's Jeep.

The house is mostly a wreck, but isn't so far gone that it couldn't be saved.  Despite many broken and missing windows, the floors are surprisingly solid in all but two rooms. In what was left of the bathroom, Kate and I found a shelf with a cup and ancient toothbrushes.  No Oral-B's there.  It appeared whoever moved out, just left, leaving everyday items behind. 



She and I spent two hours slowly creeping along, checking for loose flooring, and taking photos as we went.   Unlike me, Kate doesn't have a fear of heights and headed up to the second floor in spite of missing banisters along the stairwell.  I hesitantly followed her.  While she investigated the first bedroom, I was drawn to the second door.  The door had been tagged with "666" and "I hate God".  I turned the door knob and entered.  Inside the room was a mattress sitting on the floor in front of a window with all the panes missing.  The breeze coming through the broken window made the curtain flow out over the mattress like a sheet about to be spread across it.  I looked behind the door to make sure that no one was hiding behind it and that is when I saw the pants.

It looked as if someone had gone to bed one evening and hung their pants on a nail.  Since their were no windows, mud daubers, I believe cathedral daubers, had made their homes on the pants.  Cathedral mud daubers build a nest shaped like tubes, and are so named because their nests reminds you of the pipes of a church organ.  Mud daubers are common around this area.  If anything sits still for more than a few days, it will get these nests.  Under fenders, on barn walls, garage walls, and evidently pants.   They've been known to clog up vent lines around fuel filler necks and causing MIL to come on.

Anyway, I thought it was neat and a better photo than if it had just been a pair of pants left behind.  I was reminded of the History Channel show about the how nature will take over when man is gone from the earth.

I believe everything that man just said---because it was exactly what I wanted to hear.  Space Ghost


When you photograph people in colour you photograph their clothes.  But when you photograph people in B&W, you photograph their souls!  ~Ted Grant

Art should be vulnerable....images should be about what something feels like as well as what it looks like. Duane Michals

Offline Cookie Monster

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2009, 06:21:49 pm »
I really enjoyed the van story. :lol:
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Offline JWC

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2009, 07:30:45 pm »
Thanks.  I'm hoping others will post some photos and the stories behind them.  The van situation was unusual to say the least.  Damn it was a lot of fun.

My hiking boots were soaked from tramping around the snow all day and into the night.  I put them by the fire to dry them out while we slept.  We were laying on the roadway because it was the only flat surface available.  We were all pretty drunk from the Southern Comfort, except the kid of course, and were just lying there looking at the stars and watching the occasional satellite pass by.  Colvin said, "hey, John, your boot on fire".  I sat up and grabbed my boots.  I had placed them a little close to the fire and the shoe laces had burned off of them.

That was one hell of a weekend.  Any time I traveled with Jim and crew, something always happened.  Jim just had a knack for trouble finding him.  Jim is pretty unique.  Former USMC, served in Vietnam, missed the fighting and quit the Marines when they wouldn't send him back immediately following his first tour.  

His father was a Navy officer and was on the Enterprise when it arrived back at Pearl Harbor after the attack.  When they were stationed in Rhode Island, Jim heard a lot of yelling one day and found that it was from a bunch of people yelling for someone to save a drowning little boy.  Jim watched, but none of the adults was moving to jump into the water, so he did.  He saved the little boy.  He received a certificate for bravery from the city.  He was twelve years old at the time.
I believe everything that man just said---because it was exactly what I wanted to hear.  Space Ghost


When you photograph people in colour you photograph their clothes.  But when you photograph people in B&W, you photograph their souls!  ~Ted Grant

Art should be vulnerable....images should be about what something feels like as well as what it looks like. Duane Michals

Offline ifcar

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2009, 01:51:56 pm »
Thanks.  I'm hoping others will post some photos and the stories behind them.

You've got more and better stories than the rest of us, and more and better photos than most of the rest of us. I imagine you'll own this thread.

Offline CALL_911

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #5 on: November 22, 2009, 07:43:20 pm »
I enjoyed those stories, especially the van one. :lol:

Offline JWC

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #6 on: December 10, 2009, 09:22:24 pm »
So....two weeks ago Kate comes by.  I asked her if she had been back to the abandoned house where the pants were hanging.  She said that she had, with her boyfriend.  They didn't stay long, she said, because her boyfriend didn't like the place.  There was a weird noise in the house..she said it was just the wind, he said there was no wind blowing....so, they left.

Tonight, I'm going through photos on an old external hard drive...and find that I had photographed inside that house before.  I didn't stay long either, because their was a odd noise all through the house, which I attributed to wasps and hornets in the walls.

What caught my eye was those same pants.  Only on my last visit they were hanging in the hallway, in practically the same position and with the same nests.  The exif info says I was last in the house in 2005.

Haunted house?????

I believe everything that man just said---because it was exactly what I wanted to hear.  Space Ghost


When you photograph people in colour you photograph their clothes.  But when you photograph people in B&W, you photograph their souls!  ~Ted Grant

Art should be vulnerable....images should be about what something feels like as well as what it looks like. Duane Michals

Offline ifcar

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2009, 09:25:13 pm »
So....two weeks ago Kate comes by.  I asked her if she had been back to the abandoned house where the pants were hanging.  She said that she had, with her boyfriend.  They didn't stay long, she said, because her boyfriend didn't like the place.  There was a weird noise in the house..she said it was just the wind, he said there was no wind blowing....so, they left.

Tonight, I'm going through photos on an old external hard drive...and find that I had photographed inside that house before.  I didn't stay long either, because their was a odd noise all through the house, which I attributed to wasps and hornets in the walls.

What caught my eye was those same pants.  Only on my last visit they were hanging in the hallway, in practically the same position and with the same nests.  The exif info says I was last in the house in 2005.

Haunted house?????



Why would the pants have moved in an abandoned house?

Offline JWC

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #8 on: December 10, 2009, 09:27:26 pm »
Why would the pants have moved in an abandoned house?

That's what I'm wondering.  I'd say homeless person, but with all the trash in the floor, why move just a pair of pants and hand them in a different room. Especially those pants....it isn't like you're gong to wear them.    Everything else appears the same.

Can't wait to call Kate tomorrow.


(...and why move them to another floor.  Originally they were in the first floor hallway.  Now, they are in the second floor, second bedroom.....behind a door marked "666" and "I hate god".  Shit's weird.)
« Last Edit: December 10, 2009, 09:29:51 pm by JWC »
I believe everything that man just said---because it was exactly what I wanted to hear.  Space Ghost


When you photograph people in colour you photograph their clothes.  But when you photograph people in B&W, you photograph their souls!  ~Ted Grant

Art should be vulnerable....images should be about what something feels like as well as what it looks like. Duane Michals

Offline ifcar

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #9 on: December 10, 2009, 09:29:31 pm »
That's what I'm wondering.  I'd say homeless person, but with all the trash in the floor, why move just a pair of pants and hand them in a different room. Especially those pants....it isn't like you're gong to wear them.    Everything else appears the same.

Can't wait to call Kate tomorrow.

Oh, I misread -- I thought you'd said they were in the same place.

Some photographer who thought they were interesting?

Offline JWC

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #10 on: December 10, 2009, 09:32:40 pm »
Could be, but this house is owned by quite an eccentric family.  They usually beat people up for trespassing.  I'm lucky enough to know them. 

Even so, the original spot was more interesting.  Empty clothes hangers were lined up along the wall also.
I believe everything that man just said---because it was exactly what I wanted to hear.  Space Ghost


When you photograph people in colour you photograph their clothes.  But when you photograph people in B&W, you photograph their souls!  ~Ted Grant

Art should be vulnerable....images should be about what something feels like as well as what it looks like. Duane Michals

Offline JWC

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #11 on: December 10, 2009, 09:34:49 pm »
Oh, and evidently Kate's boyfriend and me are wussies.    :lol:
I believe everything that man just said---because it was exactly what I wanted to hear.  Space Ghost


When you photograph people in colour you photograph their clothes.  But when you photograph people in B&W, you photograph their souls!  ~Ted Grant

Art should be vulnerable....images should be about what something feels like as well as what it looks like. Duane Michals

Offline JWC

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #12 on: December 21, 2009, 09:52:00 am »
I started this rant in the photo contest forum, but decided that wasn't the place for it.

I see too many photographers, not thinking about what they are doing, just clicking away and hoping for the best.  It seems the process to "make" not "take" a photo has begun to disappear with the advent of digital photography and the fact that film is no longer "wasted" and cost money.    A local photographer advertises a one hour shoot, $130.00, plus you buy have to buy the prints, with a minimum of 75-80 shots to choose from.  Oh, and the photographer will do a "write up" of your portrait session on her blog.  Really....a write up?  People pay for that shit?  That just kills me.  Not to mention it is less than a minute for each frame...errr, image and you get a write up.

The law of averages says that at least six shots are going to be good...and that is what is posted on the websites, but with careful planning, you should be able to get twice that.  Admittedly, not every shot counted even with film, the rule of thumb was three or four shots were good/great out of of a 36exp roll.  Still, that was usually because of a distracted subject, closed eyes, etc., not because the photographer shot everything and hoped something stuck, like throwing spaghetti on a wall to see if it is done.

I haven't seen anything on a "modern" portrait website that couldn't have been shot with a P&S by someone's aunt or uncle.  In other words, why spend $130.00 or more for snap shots?  
I believe everything that man just said---because it was exactly what I wanted to hear.  Space Ghost


When you photograph people in colour you photograph their clothes.  But when you photograph people in B&W, you photograph their souls!  ~Ted Grant

Art should be vulnerable....images should be about what something feels like as well as what it looks like. Duane Michals

Offline ifcar

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #13 on: December 21, 2009, 09:56:48 am »
I think you're just seeing people with more room to experiment and treating that somehow as a bad thing.

Offline JWC

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #14 on: December 21, 2009, 10:39:46 am »
I think you're just seeing people with more room to experiment and treating that somehow as a bad thing.

It is okay to experiment....but, charging people to let you experiment and calling it your "style" isn't right....in my book anyway.

If it was truly a "new exciting style", then they are behind the times.  We did that twenty years ago, it was called a "photo journalistic" style.   Even then, we avoided blown highlights, avoided skies without any detail (blown out) etc.  I've tossed photos that were better than some are charging for because they didn't meet the technical requirements of a good photo.
I believe everything that man just said---because it was exactly what I wanted to hear.  Space Ghost


When you photograph people in colour you photograph their clothes.  But when you photograph people in B&W, you photograph their souls!  ~Ted Grant

Art should be vulnerable....images should be about what something feels like as well as what it looks like. Duane Michals

Offline JWC

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2010, 05:55:47 pm »



Since voting has gone past any chance that the story behind it will influence any votes....not really much of a story anyway.  It does show just how dedicated (read that as "stupid") some people are when it comes to photography.  This photo came about unexpectedly.  Even though I often traveled through the sunroom,  I hadn't noticed the spider, web, or egg sack until baby spiders started pouring from it....on the day I came home from surgery. 

On a Monday afternoon, I was informed I had to have back surgery.  The following Wednesday morning, I was being wheeled into a operating room and then spent the next two days high as a kite on morphine.  On Friday morning I was released after my last good dose of drugs.  For the first time in years I was pain free and was enjoying the pain killers.   I felt wonderful.  The wife helped me into the house, but I felt too good to follow the doctor's instructions about going straight to bed and started walking around the house.  When I entered the sunroom, I glanced at the side window and saw the pulsating egg sack with momma spider tucked below it. 

With my RN wife hovering over me, reminding me that I was just out of the hospital and still very drugged up, I started pulling camera cases out and setting up camera, lens, and tripod.  I managed to get about six shots off before my wife finally convinced me I was running the risk of pulling out staples and damaging my freshly reworked back.

The spiders were in the sunroom with the web stretched across a window pane.  The background was our backyard fence and the roof of the house behind it.  I didn't like the first few shots because I was using my flash, which balanced the lighting, but made the clutter in the background totally visible and distracting.  I turned the flash off, metered for the mother spider and then shot a few more frames.  The background blew out and hid the clutter.  Though it made the lighting harsh, that did the job.

The wife finally convinced me to hang it up and go to bed.  Luckily, my stupidity didn't do any harm to my recent spinal repairs and I can say that I shot baby spiders while high on morphine. :lol:

I believe everything that man just said---because it was exactly what I wanted to hear.  Space Ghost


When you photograph people in colour you photograph their clothes.  But when you photograph people in B&W, you photograph their souls!  ~Ted Grant

Art should be vulnerable....images should be about what something feels like as well as what it looks like. Duane Michals

Offline JWC

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2010, 05:56:39 pm »
P.S.,

I totally scared of spiders....and high places.
I believe everything that man just said---because it was exactly what I wanted to hear.  Space Ghost


When you photograph people in colour you photograph their clothes.  But when you photograph people in B&W, you photograph their souls!  ~Ted Grant

Art should be vulnerable....images should be about what something feels like as well as what it looks like. Duane Michals

Offline Raza

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #17 on: January 17, 2010, 06:47:39 pm »
Yeesh; I'd have set fire to the thing and walked away.
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Offline JWC

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #18 on: January 24, 2010, 05:07:35 pm »
What a totally fucked up day.  I've been planning all week to head out with the Beetle and get some shots around town.  Went to bed early last night and woke up at 4:30; couldn't get back to sleep. I didn't feel well, but decided to have breakfast and head out anyway.  The weather didn't want to co-operate at first, but around nine, the sun started to break through the clouds.  

I loaded the VW. The 10D was just an afterthought today, this was film day.  I loaded my 35mm EOS-1, the Hi-Matic, and the RB67. The RB67 still had a Polaroid back attached with a four photos left so I figured it would be fun to take it along.

Finally found the perfect spot.  Lined up the car, made some light meter readings, and started with the EOS-1. Each time the shutter would try to fire, the low battery warning would flash and the camera would crash.  Pulled the battery pack, checked the contacts, reloaded it and still no go.  Okay, I thought, screw it, I'll take a Polaroid with the RB to check the exposure and composition, then use the Hi-Matic.   Took the Polaroid and while it processed, rechecked the EOS1.  Then I decided that I'd run home and get new batteries to replace the new batteries I loaded Saturday night.  



I got home, replaced the batteries, and had the same problem.  Swapped the lens over to a Canon Elan IIe and put fresh batteries in that camera.   Back out to the car, I gave it a try.  It wouldn't achieve focus confirmation, so it wouldn't fire.  By now I'm pissed and frustrated.  I still have the Polaroid though.  So, I pulled it apart only to find that the film was old and the back had come apart--causing over-exposure and blacking out half the image.

On that note, I gave up.   Maybe next Sunday.


Edit:

My daughter's car broke down this weekend, her boyfriend backed into it and crunched the front end, and the wrecker crew I use is 90 miles away in Wilmington today.  Like....DAMN!!
« Last Edit: January 25, 2010, 08:21:51 am by JWC »
I believe everything that man just said---because it was exactly what I wanted to hear.  Space Ghost


When you photograph people in colour you photograph their clothes.  But when you photograph people in B&W, you photograph their souls!  ~Ted Grant

Art should be vulnerable....images should be about what something feels like as well as what it looks like. Duane Michals

Offline JWC

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #19 on: January 28, 2010, 10:49:03 am »
The photo of my Dad's "stuff" has, for some reason, stopped working on the host site.  If I can get it back working again, I'll repost it here. 

For those who recall the photo, the items in the photo represent a part of his life that was important to him.  They are:

-USMC, represented by his MACS-6 plaque, his service ribbons, his boots.
-His enjoyment of pipe smoking, he also enjoyed cigars.
-His college degree from Louisville, represented by the typewriter he used in college.  He went to Louisville after retiring from the Marines. 
-His love of family history, represented by the book wrote on the Bonner family, one of our Scot-Irish ancestors who moved to the U.S. in the mid-1700's.  The 3.5 floppy discs contain the chapters of the book he was working on at the time of his death.
-Photography, represented by his Minolta SLR that he bought in Japan on his way his second ToD to Vietnam.  On one Pacific fleet cruise, he was assigned the task of photographing his group aboard ship.  His photos of a Bob Hope show appeared in the fleet's cruise book.
-His love of coffee and breakfast, his favorite meal, is represented by the IHOP coffee cup.  He must have stolen it. 

The eye glasses and the sword letter opener were on his desk when we entered the house after his death.  He died in his sleep.  One of my sisters, her daughter, and myself entered the house the day after he was found by the Talladega Sheriff's Dept.  He had put his computer on stand-by, laid his glasses on some papers on his desk, and went to bed.  Five days later, his body was discovered.

I believe everything that man just said---because it was exactly what I wanted to hear.  Space Ghost


When you photograph people in colour you photograph their clothes.  But when you photograph people in B&W, you photograph their souls!  ~Ted Grant

Art should be vulnerable....images should be about what something feels like as well as what it looks like. Duane Michals

Offline mzziaz

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #20 on: January 28, 2010, 10:55:59 am »
What a totally fucked up day.  I've been planning all week to head out with the Beetle and get some shots around town.  Went to bed early last night and woke up at 4:30; couldn't get back to sleep. I didn't feel well, but decided to have breakfast and head out anyway.  The weather didn't want to co-operate at first, but around nine, the sun started to break through the clouds. 

I loaded the VW. The 10D was just an afterthought today, this was film day.  I loaded my 35mm EOS-1, the Hi-Matic, and the RB67. The RB67 still had a Polaroid back attached with a four photos left so I figured it would be fun to take it along.

Finally found the perfect spot.  Lined up the car, made some light meter readings, and started with the EOS-1. Each time the shutter would try to fire, the low battery warning would flash and the camera would crash.  Pulled the battery pack, checked the contacts, reloaded it and still no go.  Okay, I thought, screw it, I'll take a Polaroid with the RB to check the exposure and composition, then use the Hi-Matic.   Took the Polaroid and while it processed, rechecked the EOS1.  Then I decided that I'd run home and get new batteries to replace the new batteries I loaded Saturday night. 



I got home, replaced the batteries, and had the same problem.  Swapped the lens over to a Canon Elan IIe and put fresh batteries in that camera.   Back out to the car, I gave it a try.  It wouldn't achieve focus confirmation, so it wouldn't fire.  By now I'm pissed and frustrated.  I still have the Polaroid though.  So, I pulled it apart only to find that the film was old and the back had come apart--causing over-exposure and blacking out half the image.


You need   :cheers:


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Offline JWC

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #21 on: January 28, 2010, 11:09:34 am »
Considering the EOS-1 was a 1994 and the Elan IIe was from around 1996, I'd say they served their purpose well.  Nikons are good cameras, but are over priced and have an inflated reputation that is based on their late sixties-early 70's F series more than their cameras from the 1980's and 1990's.  Nikon made up for any short comings in the 1990's AF wars, by one simple marketing tool---keeping the bayonet mount the same for AF as manual lenses.  Canon redesigned theirs and their FD lenses would not fit the newer camera bodies and it hurt sales. 

Minolta had one of the best pro level cameras during the seventies and early eighties with their XK series.  Unfortunately, they dropped the ball by not building the camera body to accomodate a motor drive/winder.  Instead, you had to buy an XK-M which had the drive built into the body.  The XK-M was over twice the price of the standard XK and not many photographers were going to dish out that kind of money.
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Offline rohan

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #22 on: January 28, 2010, 12:00:54 pm »
This is just a simple short story behind the photo.  We went up north this summer and went to have BBQ cookout and drinks at the beach at Tony's parents Lake Michigan cottage.  It's up pretty high over (not up on a hill but tall and hover right over it)  the beach and water and just down below it is a 15x15 sand pit for the kids with about 2 feet of sand sitting on top of a sandy-ish beach so they can dig as deep as they want.   Lauren saw that play area and just couldn't wait to play down there.  after we ate and went down for drinks and a campfire she played in that thing until she fell asleep sitting up with a shovel in one hand and a pail in the other.  The pic I took of that didn't turn out at all unfortunately and this is all I have of that.   This was one of the nicest days I can remember in my life it was so relaxing and it was one of those days you wished you could just freeze in time.  If I get to pick anyday to relive for eternity in heaven this is the one I'll pick.

« Last Edit: January 28, 2010, 12:06:06 pm by rohan »
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Offline JWC

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #23 on: January 28, 2010, 12:28:07 pm »
Rohan, that is a gorgeous shot.  Thanks for contributing. 

I love to hear stories about a photo, the people in it, how it was done, why etc.   I have a book called "Moments".  The book is about Pulitzer Prize winning photos and the stories behind them.  It was the inspiration for this thread.  One of my favorites from the book was taken, I believe, in 1953.  The photo is of a semi that had plunged through the guard rail of a bridge, the cab hanging over the side with only the trailer keeping the tractor from falling.  Just as rescuers pulled the driver through the door, a by-stander took a photo of the rescue.  The by-stander only had an ancient Brownie box camera with old film in it.  It is a great photo and demonstrates that the subject and the photographer make the photo, not the gear.
I believe everything that man just said---because it was exactly what I wanted to hear.  Space Ghost


When you photograph people in colour you photograph their clothes.  But when you photograph people in B&W, you photograph their souls!  ~Ted Grant

Art should be vulnerable....images should be about what something feels like as well as what it looks like. Duane Michals

hotrodalex

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #24 on: January 28, 2010, 08:00:58 pm »
This is a crappy quality picture, as it was taken with my cell phone a couple of years ago. However, it stills means a lot to me. My dad and I were down in Nashville for a car show and were having a good time. I saw the potential for this shot the whole day and was kicking myself for forgetting the camera back at home. I shot it with the cell phone and still like it. The shot is there, just not the quality. Anyways, this reminds me of a "freeze time" moment, like Rohan mentioned. It was a very nice day and after the car show we crossed the river and went to cruise around downtown Nashville. We just cruised around listening to Boston, without a care in the world. I don't know why this stuck in my head, but for some reason I felt completely happy - like nothing in the world could possibly be better.


Offline Rupert

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #25 on: January 28, 2010, 08:13:00 pm »
This is a crappy quality picture, as it was taken with my cell phone a couple of years ago. However, it stills means a lot to me. My dad and I were down in Nashville for a car show and were having a good time. I saw the potential for this shot the whole day and was kicking myself for forgetting the camera back at home. I shot it with the cell phone and still like it. The shot is there, just not the quality. Anyways, this reminds me of a "freeze time" moment, like Rohan mentioned. It was a very nice day and after the car show we crossed the river and went to cruise around downtown Nashville. We just cruised around listening to Boston, without a care in the world. I don't know why this stuck in my head, but for some reason I felt completely happy - like nothing in the world could possibly be better.



A few minutes messing with the levels in Photoshop:

« Last Edit: January 28, 2010, 08:22:05 pm by Rupert »
Novarolla-Miata-Trooper-Jeep-Volvo-Trooper-Ranger-MGB-Explorer-944-Fiat-Alfa-XTerra

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Offline Laconian

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #26 on: January 28, 2010, 10:51:35 pm »
A few minutes messing with the levels in Photoshop:


I dunno, now it looks like a well-watched VHS tape!
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Offline Rupert

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #27 on: January 28, 2010, 11:05:23 pm »
It does. But at least it's not grey!
Novarolla-Miata-Trooper-Jeep-Volvo-Trooper-Ranger-MGB-Explorer-944-Fiat-Alfa-XTerra

13 cars, 60 cylinders, 52 manual forward gears and 9 automatic, 2 FWD, 42 doors, 1988 average year of manufacture, 3 convertibles, 22 average mpg, and no wheel covers.
PRO TENACIA NULLA VIA EST INVIA

hotrodalex

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #28 on: January 29, 2010, 03:29:58 am »
I dunno, now it looks like a well-watched VHS tape!

:lol:

It does look a bit better. But I'm still mad I forgot to bring a proper camera.

Offline Raza

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Re: Stories behind the photos
« Reply #29 on: January 29, 2010, 07:23:36 am »


This was an emotionally tough photo to take, considering how attached I still am to my last car.  It took me over a year to take this photo.

It's a different angle from most of the pictures I took in that spot, but it is one of the last photo locations I used on the day I turned in my Passat and took delivery of the Jetta. 

I went with black and white because I thought it captured the dead of winter better than a color photo.  I liked how stark and lonely everything looks in black and white. 
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